THE expat problem

I had written about my expat problem (link here) and now I am sitting in anxiety, dealing with what I believe to be THE expat problem. Demobilization. Moving again!

And I want to write about it because for those who aren’t expats, being an expat isn’t as glorious as we portray it to be through our pictures that we post. Especially the expat who is on global mobilization, like my family is. Meaning we move around from country to country for work. (One can categorize expats into two groups. The other group are what we like to call love pats, they have moved to the country where their spouse is from. They usually don’t move around.)

Some may think it is just another flight and move to a new city. There is so much more to it for an expat. Residency permits need to be turned in. Plants and cars need to be sold. Bank accounts need to be cancelled. Schools need to be notified and applied for, again. Pets need to have their accommodations sorted out while we move into temporary ones. Food needs to be passed on. We have to say goodbye to our friends, or rather see you later.

I have heard it from many of how great it seems to be living an expat life, but there are plenty of downsides, and demobilization is one of them. We make the best of our last days in each country, checking off our bucket lists. The grass is greener where you water it! Even if there for only a short period of time!

Camel racing

I briefly had read about camel racing and didn’t know much besides that I wanted to see it while living in Qatar. When I asked friends about it, they would say it is worth it, but details were minimal. (Somewhat like my trip out to searching for shark teeth! See post here!)

I knew that I could find the location on google maps if I typed in “Camel Race track” and then follow the signs to Al Shahaniya. I also knew to go on a weekend. That was it. Schedules aren’t posted online, but with a colicky baby and preschooler, I decided to just go even though storm clouds were continuing to hover and had a downpour of rain earlier. Worse case scenario in my mind was that it would be a drive out to the desert and back.

I am happily writing to say that it was well worth it. My excitement grew when I first saw the signs for the camel race track on the Dukhan highway. Then I began hoping that there would be at least some camels lazying around, maybe training and at best, racing. Pulling into the parking lot of the 10km racetrack, the rush began, literally with white SUVs driving up to the race track and following the camels that were racing. We had lucked out and made it during a race! Feeling slightly like a black sheep, I parked our black SUV off to the side, away from all the white SUVs, carefully got out the kids and went up to the race track. It was no Kentucky derby for sure! (Not that I have ever been there, but I have gone to Santa Anita plenty of times, and let’s just say that camel racing is not to be compared.)

Here is a little video clip, note the jockeys!

You now saw it! A little remote controlled robot jockey!

Some other fun facts:

  • Known as the sport of the sheiks
  • Professional camel racing began in 1972
  • There is an actual tv station dedicated exclusively to the camel races
  • The camels can have a speed up to 40 mph
  • The camels can cost up to one million Qatari riyals

My bonus to my memories is this lovely booklet that they handed out for free upon entrance!